75 Twitter Ready Quotes

Twitter. It is huge. If you aren’t on Twitter you should be, it just may be taking over the world. The social media site is used as a marketing tool, to spread news, to entertain, and even has even changed the world.

Of all the things I like about Twitter (including all the live tweets about the OKC Thunder), my favorite aspect of this expansive social network is the ability to follow superstars throughout the world. Many Twitter users follow entertainers, and if you look at the top 5 most popular people on Twitter you easily recognize this:

I, however, follow very few entertainers (OKC Thunder players excluded, of course), but superstars in the leadership, team-building, and motivation world. People like John C. Maxwell, Tom Peters , Dave Ramsey, or even the Association of Experiential Education.

Some Twitterers, like Craig Groeschel post about their work in this world, some like Scott Williams, tweet about their blog, their family, and their everyday life (and love of the Thunder). Others, such as Petteri Tarkkonen, mostly share quotes about their passion.

I encourage you to use Twitter in whatever capacity you feel appropriate. To aid you in that process, I have collected some awesome quotes about leadership that are Twitter-ready. They are shorter than 140 characters, include the source, and even have some of the actual Twitter accounts of the people who shared their wisdom. Copy them, add a hashtag when applicable, and start sharing with your followership. If there is one thing I know about Twitter, the more you tweet, the more people will listen.

The Quotes

The challenge of leadership is both moral & one of developing the characteristics that make us respected by one another @LouisFarrakhan

Your greatest asset is your earning ability. Your greatest resource is your time. @BrianTracy

I suppose leadership at one time meant muscles; but today it means getting along with people.  – Mahatma Gandhi

Everyone enjoys doing the kind of work for which he is best suited. – Napoleon Hill

Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other. – John F. Kennedy

Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things. – Peter Drucker

It’s not what you know; it’s what you use that makes a difference. @TheZigZiglar

Effective leadership is not about making speeches or being liked; leadership is defined by results not attributes. – Peter Drucker

Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it. – Dwight D. Eisenhower

Relationships are the hallmark of the mature person. @BrianTracy

Effective leadership is putting first things first. Effective management is discipline, carrying it out. @StephenRCovey

Example is leadership. – Albert Schweitzer

You don’t lead by hitting people over the head – that’s assault, not leadership. – Dwight D. Eisenhower

Absolute identity with one’s cause is the first and great condition of successful leadership. – Woodrow Wilson

Good leadership consists of showing average people how to do the work of superior people. – John D. Rockefeller

I have a different vision of leadership. A leadership is someone who brings people together. – George W. Bush

Leadership to me means duty, honor, country. It means character, and it means listening from time to time. – George W. Bush

Chance favors only the prepared mind. – Louis Pasteur

I forgot to shake hands and be friendly. It was an important lesson about leadership. – Lee Iacocca

Leadership does not depend on being right. – Ivan Illich

Leadership is influence. – @JohnCMaxwell

Character matters; leadership descends from character. – @RushLimbaugh

Wherever there is danger, there lurks opportunity; whenever there is opportunity, there lurks danger. -E. Nightingale

Leadership is the capacity to translate vision into reality.  - Warren G. Bennis

Leadership is, among other things, the ability to inflict pain and get away with it – short-term pain for long-term gain. – George Will

I am not a saint, unless you think of a saint as a sinner who keeps on trying. – Nelson Mandela

Leadership is intangible, and therefore no weapon ever designed can replace it. – Omar N. Bradley

The task of leadership is not to put greatness into humanity, but to elicit it, for the greatness is already there. – John Buchan

To have long-term success as a coach or in any position of leadership, you have to be obsessed in some way. – Pat Riley

The art of leadership is saying no, not saying yes. It is very easy to say yes. – @TonyBlairOffice

The book you don’t read won’t help. @OfficialJimRohn

The key to successful leadership today is influence, not authority. – @KenBlanchard

Leadership should be born out of the understanding of the needs of those who would be affected by it. – Marian Anderson

Don’t necessarily avoid sharp edges. Occasionally they are necessary to leadership. – @RumsfeldOffice

Leadership in today’s world requires far more than a large stock of gunboats and a hard fist at the conference table. – Hubert Humphrey

There are many elements to a campaign. Leadership is number one. Everything else is number two. – Bertolt Brecht

The growth and development of people is the highest calling of leadership. – Harvey S. Firestone

Leadership is getting someone to do what they don’t want to do, to achieve what they want to achieve. – Tom Landry

The secret to success is good leadership, & good leadership is all about making the lives of your team members better. @TonyDungy

If there is such a thing as good leadership, it is to give a good example. – Ingvar Kamprad

The function of leadership is to produce more leaders, not more followers. – Ralph Nader

One of the tests of leadership is the ability to recognize a problem before it becomes an emergency. – Arnold H. Glasow

Any person who contributes to prosperity must prosper in turn. -E. Nightingale

Honor bespeaks worth. Confidence begets trust. Service brings satisfaction. Cooperation proves the quality of leadership. – JC Penney

I think the greater responsibility, in terms of morality, is where leadership begins. – Norman Lear

Without initiative, leaders are simply workers in leadership positions. – Bo Bennett

The biggest mistake that you can make is to believe that you are working for somebody else. –E. Nightingale

Leadership cannot really be taught. It can only be learned. – Harold S. Geneen

Leadership is practiced not so much in words as in attitude and in actions. – Harold S. Geneen

Most people dabble their way through life, never deciding to master anything in particular. @TonyRobbins

Management is about arranging and telling. Leadership is about nurturing and enhancing. @Tom_Peters

Leadership must be established from the top down. – Sam Nunn

Always render more and better service than is expected of you, no matter what your task may be. – Og Mandino

Education is the mother of leadership. – Wendell Willkie

Leadership is the key to 99 percent of all successful efforts. – Erskine Bowles

Remember: Jobs are owned by the company, you own your career! – Earl Nightingale

We need leadership, and we need it now. – Byron Dorgan

A real decision is measured by the fact that you’ve taken a new action. @TonyRobbins

It is the responsibility of leadership to provide opportunity, and the responsibility of individuals to contribute. – William Pollard

We need leadership. We don’t need a doubling down on the failed politics of the past. @RepPaulRyan

The art of communication is the language of leadership. – James Humes

Leadership demands that we make tough choices. – Alan Autry

Leadership involves finding a parade and getting in front of it. – John Naisbitt

Leadership requires the courage to make decisions that will benefit the next generation. – Alan Autry

Leadership is an active role; ‘lead’ is a verb. But the leader who tries to do it all is headed for burnout. – Bill Owens

The test of leadership is not to put greatness into humanity, but to elicit it, for the greatness is already there. – James Buchanan

Leadership offers an opportunity to make a difference in someone’s life, no matter what the project. – Bill Owens

Leadership appears to be the art of getting others to want to do something you are convinced should be done. – Vance Packard

Leadership is unlocking people’s potential to become better. – Bill Bradley

The very exercise of leadership fosters capacity for it. – Cyril Falls

The best way to sell yourself to others is first to sell the others to yourself. – Napoleon Hill

Actions, not words, are the ultimate results of leadership. – Bill Owens

Leadership comes in small acts as well as bold strokes. @CarlyforCA

If you think you’re too small to have an impact, try going to bed with a mosquito in the room. – Anita Roddick

Ninety percent of leadership is the ability to communicate something people want. – Dianne Feinstein

I hope you can use these…I will post more Twitter-ready quotes from time-to-time, so follow along. What is your favorite quote? What is your favorite leadership quote? Let me know if I need to add it to my list!Tweet on Tweeters.

Ryan Eller
Founder, Experiential Adventure

College Admissions Rank ‘Em

This activity is for all of my TRiO lovers out there! Do you want an activity to do with high school students who are interested in pursuing a post-secondary education? This is the one for you. As a counselor for Educational Talent Search, I have often caught myself lecturing my students about the different reasons to pick a college. Do they want to go to the University of Texas because of its academic prestige, student life, or because of the location? What about Tulsa Community College, are you going because of price, location, or the admissions criteria? Is one criteria more important that the other? This activity will help guide the students to answering these questions in a fun and interactive way.

Objective: As a group, rank a list of reasons why someone would attend college.

Group Size: You can use this activity with any size group, but to help with ease of communication, try to limit the group size to fifteen. If you have a larger group, separate the group in to several smaller groups, even groups as small as two to three people.

Props: Type of a list of factors that any student would consider when choosing post-secondary education. Place these terms on their own piece of paper. It helps to have each term on their own paper so that the participants can move them around and actually rank them on the floor or table.

Set Up: Simply place the factors on the floor or on a table so each participant can see the different words.

Description: The rules for this activity are very simple, tell the group that they should try to come to a consensus and rank all the college admission factors from most important to least important. This means that they will all agree to the final rankings. It is often hard for the group to come to a consensus, and it is more important that they begin talking about these factors than if they come to an actual consensus. Feel free to put a time-limit on this activity to keep the activity from lasting several hours!

Debrief: Take notes during the activity to some of the things the participants are saying to each other as they rank the college admission factors. Use your experience as a TRiO professional to help guide them after the activity to the most important factors in their own individual college admissions decision.

Variation: Have the participants view the factors and then write their own rankings on a piece of paper. They can then share their list to the group and explain why they ranked them.

College Admission Factors:

Price
Location
Size
Type (Private or Public)
Academic Rigor
Campus Life
Campus Aesthetics
Your Friends Go There
Your Family
Majors Offered
Athletics
Greek Life
Setting (Urban, Suburban or Rural)
Admissions Criteria
Housing Options
Religious Affiliation

Follow My YouTube Channel

I love YouTube. It is an excellent mix of powerful informative videos and clips of hilarious cats.

 

I love watching cats and their shenanigans, but I love a great experiential-based video as well. YouTube is packed with informative videos that highlight different group activities. I have been ransacking the world web for the best videos covering team-building activities, name games, icebreakers, chants and jingles, and so much more. I created a YouTube channel that highlights my favorite videos, displays my personal videos, and even has playlists of different activities. I tried to find videos that were fun and clear, but also included explanations and instructions to facilitate the activities.

Here is one of my favorite icebreaker videos, Human Javelin, by the fine folks at Ultimate Camp Resource.

 

Take some time, check it out, and see what other experts around the globe have displayed on YouTube. I will be consistently adding videos to the playlist, so please let me know what you think and tell me if you have any good videos I have overlooked!

Have a great day!

Ryan Eller
Founder, Experiential Adventure
ryan@experientialadventure.com

Don’t Break the Ice – Team Building Activity

Ever been influenced? Someone ever pushed you to doing something you didn’t want to do? What about something you did want to do?

Experiential Adventure Influences
I don’t know who influenced this awesomeness, but thank you. 

Influences, you got to love them. Sometimes influences are positive, they can push you to achieve new heights and reach your goals. Jerrod Murr, my personal assistant, is a solid influence in my life. He has inspired me in so many ways, and I am glad to have him in my life. Other times influences can be negative. I try to avoid negative influences like the plague.

Influences are the premise behind this classic and easy team-building initiative I first learned in Boston at Project Adventure. Step back to your childhood and buy the only prop needed in this activity, a new or gently used set of Don’t Break the Ice.

Experiential Adventure Don't Break the Ice
No need to keep the little ice-skating man.

Don’t Break the Ice

Number of Participants: 10-20
Time:  10-15 minutes
Activity Level:  Low
Props:  Set of Don’t Break the Ice

Objective: To lift the ice cubes higher than the group’s head.

Set Up: Set 3 ice cubes on the floor in a straight row in between two participants.

Rules: A participant can only use the tip of their index finger on one hand.

Description:

Find a creative way to pair up the group members. I usually ask them to find the person in the group with an index finger similar in size to theirs. Placing the blocks in between two participants, challenge the dyad to raise the three ice cubes above their head only using the tip of their index finger.

Enjoy watching the teams push the cubes back and forth, up and down, and even upside down to achieve their goal. After the team has reached new ice cube heights, encourage the teams to pair up with another group, combine the cubes, and try it again. Then double the group size again, and again, and again…or until the entire group is lifting their cubes into the air!

Experiential Adventure
Can they do it?
Experiential Adventure Don
They are doing it!
Experiential Adventure Don't Break the Ice
They did it!

Variation: Challenge the participants to use their non-dominant hand.

Questions for Discussion:

1. How did you get influenced to accomplish your goal?
2. Are influences negative or positive?
3. Did you “give in” to the influences, or did you “push” against them?
4. What types of influences do you have in your life?
5. Has there ever been a time in your life when you felt influenced? Was it negative or positive?

Facilitator Notes:

1. Sometimes it is easier to accomplish this task if the teams are lifting an actually cube of ice cubes. (Not a 3D cube, but a flat cube of ice cubes on the floor…more like a square. Definitely a square. I should have used that in the example.)
2. Sometimes it is easier to accomplish this task if the teams are lifting a square of ice cubes. (Made more sense, huh?)

If you have any questions, comments or suggestions either leave a note below or email me!
Ryan Eller
Founder, Experiential Adventure
ryan@experientialadventure.com

Traffic Jam

Happy First Friday of 2012!

I hope you all had an excellent break and a great start to the year. Over the break I had some time to “research” different experiential  learning and team-building activities (i.e. I watch a ton of things on YouTube). I came across several great videos from these fellas, and I feel they did a great job explaining Traffic Jam. I first learned Traffic Jam at Project Adventure in Boston, and I have loved facilitating it ever since.

Traffic Jam
Number of Participants: 6-16 (It sure helps to have an even number)
Time: 15-30 min.
Energy Level: Low

Traffic Jam is a puzzling activity. I use this activity as a real problem-solving initiative for the participants. It is perfect for participants to think outside of the box, learn through trial by error, and of course to challenge the communication skills of the group.

I pair this activity with a decision-making worksheet or workshop. This really encourages the participants to think about different ways to solve a common problem. I will invite the participants to share their frustrations, obstacles, successes, and failures with the group. Often times I will take note on the different times participants deem this activity impossible, and reread those statements to the group during processing.

Questions for Review:
1. What types of difficulties did you encounter by standing in a linear row?
2. How did you finally determine the solution?
3. In our everyday walk of life, how do we handle poor communication? What are ways we can overcome poor communication?
4. Have you ever encountered an activity that seemed impossible and you overcame it? How did you accomplish that task?
5. What ways can we work as a team to overcome a daunting task?
6. What decisions needed to be made for us to be successful?

You can play the activity online to see if you can solve the puzzle. Click the link or the picture to play the game! Do you think you can figure it out?

Arrows

Experiential Adventure Traffic Jam
Traffic Jam

Please do not hesitate to email me if you need any advice, have questions, or suggestions for this activity.

Ryan Eller, Founder
Experiential Adventure
ryan@experientialadventure

Fortune Cookie Debrief

Have you ever had an awesome workshop, ropes course trip, or initiative with a group and then be at a complete loss of words and have no idea on how to debrief afterwards? I know I certainly have. I sometimes literally hear crickets after an activity when I ask students to share their thoughts. Other times I will end up dominating the conversation (this happens more often than not), and the participants would have liked to share their thoughts if I hadn’t taken the words out of their mouth.

I picked up this debriefing technique along the way that encourages our participants to share and discuss while processing after an activity: The Fortune Cookie Debrief!

Experiential Adventure

Here is how the debrief works: First, collect fortunes. There are a few ways to accomplish this you can either buy fortunes cookies from a retailer, such as Wal-Mart, Target, or any other fine establishment. You can create your own fortunes by going to a website and printing off fortunes and placing them inside empty Easter eggs. You can certainly buy a very nice Fortune Cookie Debrief set from the fine folks at Training Wheels. The best way, in my humble opinion, to collect fortunes is to gather them over time from your favorite Chinese restaurant. This option will take some time and dedication, but will totally be worth the hard-earned meals you must eat to collect all the fortunes you need.

Once you have collected your fortunes, use them as a debrief after your favorite activity, meeting, workshop or keynote address. Encourage each participant to grab a fortune out the pile of cookies or eggs, and hold on to it until everyone has grabbed one. Next, you will invite the participants to open their cookie/egg, read their fortune, and then relate it to the activity they just accomplished. Ask participants if they will read their fortune aloud to the group, and if they have any other thoughts or “fortunes” to share with the group. You could even simply encourage the participants to each read their fortune to the group, and let the participants pick the one that best described the group or activity.

I have found that most of my participants love The Fortune Cookie Debrief! They enjoy sharing their fortune and have an easy time relating it to the group’s successes or failures. This debrief certainly aids participants in sharing their thoughts, ideas, suggestions and frustrations, and is absolutely perfect to use at the end of a long day to wrap up all of the group’s activities.

Play around with this debrief. Share it with your friends and use it in situations where you have traditionally struggled to create an environment of group participation. Let me know how it goes, share your successes with me, and let me know if you have any great ideas or suggestions to improve The Fortune Cookie Debrief.

“People learn, retain what they learn, and use what they learn when they have fun with what they learn.” – Caine and Caine

Fortune Cookie Debrief

Have you ever had an awesome workshop, ropes course trip, or initiative with a group and then be at a complete loss of words and have no idea on how to debrief afterwards? I know I certainly have. I sometimes literally hear crickets after an activity when I ask students to share their thoughts. Other times I will end up dominating the conversation (this happens more often than not), and the participants would have liked to share their thoughts if I hadn’t taken the words out of their mouth.

I picked up this debriefing technique along the way that encourages our participants to share and discuss while processing after an activity: The Fortune Cookie Debrief!

Experiential Adventure

Here is how the debrief works: First, collect fortunes. There are a few ways to accomplish this you can either buy fortunes cookies from a retailer, such as Wal-Mart, Target, or any other fine establishment. You can create your own fortunes by going to a website and printing off fortunes and placing them inside empty Easter eggs. You can certainly buy a very nice Fortune Cookie Debrief set from the fine folks at Training Wheels. The best way, in my humble opinion, to collect fortunes is to gather them over time from your favorite Chinese restaurant. This option will take some time and dedication, but will totally be worth the hard-earned meals you must eat to collect all the fortunes you need.

Once you have collected your fortunes, use them as a debrief after your favorite activity, meeting, workshop or keynote address. Encourage each participant to grab a fortune out the pile of cookies or eggs, and hold on to it until everyone has grabbed one. Next, you will invite the participants to open their cookie/egg, read their fortune, and then relate it to the activity they just accomplished. Ask participants if they will read their fortune aloud to the group, and if they have any other thoughts or “fortunes” to share with the group. You could even simply encourage the participants to each read their fortune to the group, and let the participants pick the one that best described the group or activity.

I have found that most of my participants love The Fortune Cookie Debrief! They enjoy sharing their fortune and have an easy time relating it to the group’s successes or failures. This debrief certainly aids participants in sharing their thoughts, ideas, suggestions and frustrations, and is absolutely perfect to use at the end of a long day to wrap up all of the group’s activities.

Play around with this debrief. Share it with your friends and use it in situations where you have traditionally struggled to create an environment of group participation. Let me know how it goes, share your successes with me, and let me know if you have any great ideas or suggestions to improve The Fortune Cookie Debrief.

“People learn, retain what they learn, and use what they learn when they have fun with what they learn.” – Caine and Caine

 

Book Review: On The Edge Games For Youth Ministry by Karl Rohnke

I have just finished reading Karl Rohnke’s little known book, On The Edge Games for Youth Ministry, and I loved it! The title may be deceiving, so don’t think these activities are just for Youth Ministry, because this book is packed full of activities perfect for any facilitator, regardless of group type. Karl Rohnke

My favorite activity in the book was Foot to Foot Pass, a fun and interactive game that will get your group laughing and meeting each other in a fun way. In this activity, the group members take off their shoes, sit in a circle, and pass a beach ball around the circle with their feet. When they pass the ball to the person next to them, the passer says the name of the person receiving the ball. If your group already knows each other well, they can say something else, like their favorite color or the place they want to vacation.

Karl Rohnke is the king of experiential education, and has written over 20 books full of great games, initiatives, activities, and ropes course instruction. His most famous books are The Bottomless Bag and Silver Bullets. His activities are so well-known and well spread that you probably have done 100s of them, but do not know he created them. He also helped found Project Adventure and High Five Adventure. He is a legend.

At the end of the description of each activity there was a “Learning Option.” The Learning Options tied each activity to a scripture and lessons applicable to youth ministers. These were always informative, interactive and had questions available for the facilitator to ask the group for group communication.

I strongly encourage all facilitators to add this book to their library. I have found that you have to scan through most icebreaker and interactive activities books to find the good activities, but this is not the case for On The Edge Games for Youth Ministry. I thumb marked nearly activity as one that I will try to learn and use with my groups.

Labor Day Challenge – Day 25 – Leadership Conference

Hello from Glen Rose, TX and the Riverbend Retreat Center. I am facilitating and speaking to almost 100 of the best and brightest students from across the SWASAP area. SWASAP is short for Southwest Association of Student Assistance Programs, and encompasses all of the TRiO programs from Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas and New Mexico. I was brought in to provide experiential learning activities for the students as they traverse their leadership journey at the SWASAP Student Leadership Conference.

As a part of my Labor Day Challenge I wanted to present at a leadership conference. I will be here tonight until Sunday, and I am already loving my time here! These students will be equipped the tools necessary to be leaders at their high schools and colleges, they are being provided with direction for their dreams and ambitions, and will no doubt be successful. I love asking these students their dreams because I see their eyes sparkle when they talk about their passion. These are not average students, these are exceptional students who decided to take time out of their busy schedule to attend a leadership conference. These are students who want to be doctors, lawyers, nurses, educators, and leaders. These are students who see all of the obstacles that have been placed in their way, and fight through them. These are students who will one day be leading this world into a new frontier.

I will post about the SWASAP SLC everyday this weekend…I hope to profile a couple of students over the next couple of days and let you know the type of individuals I am working with here. As usual, I came here to teach, and I am being taught. I am learning how to persevere, how to dream and how to survive, that is what my Labor Day Challenge is all about.

Labor Day Challenge – Day 19 – Ropes Course

Welcome back to the Labor Day Challenge…I hope you are having as great a day as I am! I stayed up way too late last night (not what I have set out to do during the 6 weeks), ate too much food, but got to spend some great time with some great friends. Today I got up super early and ran with the great H1, and then headed to RSU in Claremore to facilitate at the Hilltop Challenge Course.

I love going to the ropes course, both as a participant and as an instructor. Today I was an instructor, leading activities for the Rogers County Leadership Group. I love being able to work on the course so I can practice my facilitating skills and hone my debriefing techniques. I am very passionate about experiential education, and a ropes course gives me an opportunity to pursue my passion.

We started out with activities on the ground, trying out some name games, icebreakers, initiatives and team building exercises. Our sequence was as follows:

Handshakes
Logpile
Happy Salmon
Milk the Cow
Gotchya
Fast Fingers
Clumps
Group Separation
Categories
Thumbwrestling in Stereo
Group Lineup
Human Geography
Rock, Paper, Scissor Olympics
Fast Finger Olympics

Ropes Course

Ropes Course

After having a great time on the ground,  we graduated to the low ropes course, were we completed Wild Woozy and dominated Islands. After lunch we moved to the high ropes course, where the group moved quickly through the course, pushing themselves outside of their comfort zone. I belayed the incline log, and watched as participants fought through fear, physical exhaustion, and preconceived notions of their ability to climb the course.

Ropes Course

Ropes Course

I literally got to see people live up to mantras I have set forth for myself throughout my Labor Day Challenge. It inspired me to keep going strong, especially since I have been struggling in a couple of areas of the challenge. If these people can push through to build confidence, self-esteem and leadership, I can do it too. I hope to become an excellent ropes course facilitator, I would even like to someday have my own course. I am doing the things now to make those dreams a reality, that is what my Labor Day Challenge is all about.